Education > Continuing Education

Web-Based Lectures

Previously recorded webinars are available through the LearnSTAT OnDemand program.

Current Webinar Offerings:


April 3, 2014 Use of Historical Data in Designed Experiments
April 17, 2014 Applied Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling for the Social Sciences
April 23, 2014 Variance Estimation in Complex Sample Surveys
May 12, 2014 Using Administrative Data: Strengths and Weaknesses
May 14, 2014 Modern Regression Methods for Predictive Business Analytics Using SAS and JMP
May 14, 2014 Statistical Aspects of Long Term Safety Cohort Studies
June 25, 2014 Survival Analysis: Overview of Nonparametric, Parametric, and Semiparametric Approaches
November 18, 2014 Bayesian Combination Dose Finding: Concepts and Applications




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Title: Use of Historical Data in Designed Experiments
Presenters: Beat Neuenschwander and Heinz Schmidli (Novartis Pharma AG)
Date and Time: Thursday, April 3, 2014, 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Biopharmaceutical Section

Registration Deadline: Tuesday, April 1, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
Good decision making should be based on all relevant information. While this principle is clearly attractive and often acknowledged informally, formal implementations are more ambitious and still rare, in particular in drug development. Clinical trials are often analyzed in isolation, which bears the danger of ignoring potentially valuable trial-external ("historical") information, which may result in biased and/or less precise conclusions. Evidence synthesis and meta-analysis provide the basic tools for making use of historical data. We give an overview of the various approaches to using historical data, before considering meta-analytic approaches in more detail.

The main topics of this webinar are
1) How to identify relevant historical data;
2) How to formally incorporate and discount historical data, either prospectively in a Bayesian way via meta-analytic-predictive priors, or, retrospectively in a meta-analytic-combined (Bayesian or non-Bayesian) way;
3) How to quantify the weight of historical data relative to the actual trial data via the "prior effective sample size";
4) How to achieve robust analyses (when historical and actual trial data are in conflict) via mixture priors;

These aspects are discussed from a methodological and practical perspective with examples from drug development.

Registration Fees:
Biopharmaceutical Section Members: $44
ASA Members: $59
Nonmembers: $74

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Registration is Closed

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Tuesday, April 1, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




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Title: Applied Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling for the Social Sciences
Presenter: Jeff Gill, Washington University
Date and Time: Thursday, April 17, 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time
Sponsor: Section on Bayesian Statistical Science and the International Society for Bayesian Analysis

Registration Deadline: Tuesday, April 15, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
This webinar presents a set of multilevel models for social science research that provide a great amount of flexibility to handle data at different levels of aggregation. This applied tutorial will use Markov chain Monte Carlo tools to fit linear and nonlinear specifications with multiple levels, longitudinal features, and non-normal distributional assumptions. Content will include some theoretical discussions of modeling and estimation, but will concentrate more on as practical guidance for fitting multilevel models with JAGS software.

Registration Fees:
SBSS Members: $60
ISBA Members: $60
ASA Members: $75
Nonmembers: $95

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Registration is Closed

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Tuesday, April 15, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




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Title: Variance Estimation in Complex Sample Surveys
Presenter: Richard Valliant, University of Maryland
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Survey Research Methods Section

Registration Deadline: Monday, April 21, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
This webinar will provide an overview of the methods for variance estimation in complex sample survey data. Two approaches: linearization and replication will be compared and contrasted. Software options will be examined for different types of estimates.

Registration Fees:
Members of the Survey Research Methods Section: $60
AAPOR members: $60
ASA members: $75
Nonmembers: $95

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register



Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Monday, April 21, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




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Title: Using Administrative Data: Strengths and Weaknesses
Presenter: Joe Sakshaug, University of Michigan
Date and Time: Monday, May 12, 2014, 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Survey Research Methods Section

Registration Deadline: Thursday, May 8, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
This webinar will provide a detailed overview of administrative data; their possible uses, strengths, and limitations. Real applications of administrative data used in a social context will be presented from projects conducted at the Institute for Employment Research in Nuremberg Germany.

Registration Fees:
Members of the Survey Research Methods Section: $60
AAPOR members: $60
ASA members: $75
Nonmembers: $95

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register



Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Thursday, May 8, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




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Title: Modern Regression Methods for Predictive Business Analytics Using SAS and JMP
Presenter: Simon Sheather, Texas A&M University
Date and Time: Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Section on Physical and Engineering Sciences and the Quality and Productivity Section

Registration Deadline: Monday, May 12, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
In this two hour webinar, we shall focus the challenges and issues associated with applying regression methods to problems in business. We shall focus on both

  • Explanatory modeling: the process of building and applying a statistical model that is interpretable; and
  • Predictive modeling: the process of building and applying a statistical model to data in order to predict new or future observations.

We shall follow Arnold Zellner's advice that the best explanatory models are "sophisticatedly simple".

Techniques to be discussed include multiple adaptive regression splines (MARS), shrinkage methods including lasso and elastic net and marginal model plots.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand the pros and cons of subset selection versus shrinkage methods approach (including lasso and elastic net) to model selection
  • Become familiar with the use of multiple adaptive regression splines (MARS) in analyzing regression data
  • Understand the use of marginal model plots to decide whether the regression model or the logistic regression model under consideration is a valid one or not

Registration Fees:
Members of Q&P: $75
Members of SPES: $75
Members of SSC-BISS: $75
ASA Members: $90
Nonmembers: $105

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register



Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Monday, May 12, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




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Title: Statistical Aspects of Long Term Safety Cohort Studies
Presenter: Girish (Gary) Aras (Amgen, Inc.)
Date and Time: Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Biopharmaceutical Section

Registration Deadline: Monday, May 12, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
To establish a long-term safety profile for a newly marketed drug, a long-term cohort safety study without a comparator arm is often undertaken by drug companies. Such a study routinely enrolls more subjects, and has longer study duration and less frequent scheduled visits, than a typical randomized clinical trial. In the context of such a study, we shall review basic epidemiological concepts such as prevalence and incidence associated with adverse events and discusses statistical methods employed to measure them. The study is often sized to detect adverse events that are relatively rare and/or have a long latency period, as in the case of malignancies and heart diseases. Due to the drug's mechanism of action or its membership to a drug class with a known adverse event profile, as the cumulative exposure to the drug increases longitudinally, one may anticipate an increase in incidence of certain adverse events compared to historically known background incidence. These adverse events, sometimes known as events of medical interest (EMI), are hence prospectively stated in the protocol and are followed during the study. Some of these EMI, such as infections, asthma exacerbations, and allergic rhinitis may not be rare and may exhibit seasonal variations in incidence. We shall review classification of adverse events based on prevalence that is acceptable to major regulatory agencies worldwide can be found in Report of Council for International Organization of Medical Sciences (CIOMS).

Due to the long duration and relatively lower frequency of follow up visits, dropouts are an inherent part of a long-term cohort safety study, and these factors are typically accounted for in the sample size and are modeled in the analysis. The adverse events are summarized in various ways. Estimates of cumulative incidences and annual incremental incidences based on person time of exposure/observation, cumulative event incidences, and annual incremental event rates (counting recurrent events in the numerator as opposed to counting subjects with at least one event) per person time of exposure/observation are especially popular in epidemiology literature. We shall review these measurement concepts in detail. The main limitation of these methods is that they are all based on the assumption of constant hazard over the study period. Assumption of constant hazard is equivalent to assuming that the time to event is exponentially distributed. Due to lack of better alternative, methods based on the unrealistic assumption of constant hazard rate are employed to estimate incidence rates in retrospective studies or in meta-analysis of past studies, in which dates of exposure and events are not accurately available for every subject. However, in prospective cohort studies where information at the subject level regarding dropouts and loss to follow up is readily available, more sophisticated methods such as Kaplan-Meier or life-table estimators can be employed to obtain better estimates. We shall discuss underlying assumptions and strengths and limitations of these methods as well. We may employ simulations to further characterize these methods.

The course will intermittently link the above ideas and techniques to examples from drug labels. We shall discuss how safety evidence based on such studies and are summarized or should be summarized in drug labels.

Registration Fees:
Biopharmaceutical Section Members: $44
ASA Members: $59
Nonmembers: $74

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register



Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Monday, May 12, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




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Title: Survival Analysis: Overview of Nonparametric, Parametric, and Semiparametric Approaches
Presenter: Joseph Gardinar (Michigan State University)
Date and Time: Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Biopharmaceutical Section

Registration Deadline: Monday, June 23, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
Time to event and duration outcomes arise in several fields including biostatistics, demography, economics, engineering and sociology. The terms duration analysis, event-history analysis, failure-time analysis, reliability analysis, and transition analysis refer essentially to the same group of techniques although the emphases in certain modeling aspects could differ across disciplines. In insurance and finance a similar group of techniques apply to the severity of a random event. Simply stated, the outcome of interest is a positive random variable, whose distribution is skewed and the observed outcome might be left or right or interval censored, and or left or right truncated. SASÒ Software offers a suite of procedures for analyses of time to event and severity data. They include LIFETEST, LIFEREG, PHREG, RELIABILITY, SEVERITY, QUANTLIFE and QLIM which have different capabilities and address different needs.

In this webinar we focus on techniques widely used in biostatistics. Methods include Kaplan-Meier estimation, accelerated life-testing models, and the ubiquitous Cox model. Recent developments in SAS extend their reach to include analyses of multiple failure times, recurrent events, frailty models, Markov models and use of Bayesian methods. We present an overview of some of these methods with examples illustrating their application in the appropriate context.

Registration Fees:
Biopharmaceutical Section Members: $44
ASA Members: $59
Nonmembers: $74

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register



Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Monday, June 23, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




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Title: Bayesian Combination Dose Finding: Concepts and Applications
Presenter: Simon Wandel (Cogitars)
Date and Time: Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Biopharmaceutical Section

Registration Deadline: Friday, November 14, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
Particular interest in Bayesian model-based dose finding has been observed in recent years. Multiple publications of successful single-agent phase I Oncology studies undermine the related paradigm shift which happened at some Pharmaceutical companies already and is ongoing in others. However, nowadays single agent dose finding is not the only goal in early development; rather, combination dose finding starts to play an important role which poses new challenges to clinical teams and statisticians.

In this webinar, an introduction to the statistical concept of Bayesian model-based dose finding with a particular emphasis on the combination setting will be provided. Based on practical experience, a special section will be devoted to the selection of the starting dose combination where both, statistical modeling and clinical considerations play an important role. Real case studies will be used to illustrate concepts and methods along with potential pitfalls which should be avoided. Finally, based on a literature search and on personnel communication, an overview of the current trends and adaption in the United States and in Europe will be provided.

Registration Fees:
Biopharmaceutical Section Members: $44
ASA Members: $59
Nonmembers: $74

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register



Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Friday, November 14, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.