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Wed, Oct 5

Conference Registration

7:30 AM - 6:30 PM
Pre-function

 

Workshop 1 Propensity Score Methods

8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Peter Austin, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, and University of Toronto, Canada

Propensity score methods are increasingly being used in health services and comparative effectiveness research to estimate the effects of treatments, interventions, and exposures on outcomes using observational or non-randomized data. We will begin by briefly reviewing the design and analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Participants will then be introduced to the concept of the propensity score and how it can be estimated using observational data. We will then examine how the propensity score can be used for matching, weighting, stratification, or covariate adjustment to estimate treatment effects. We will discuss how the first three of these methods allow one to mimic some of the characteristics of an RCT. We will also describe methods for assessing whether the propensity score model has been adequately specified using the observed data.

8:30 AM

Propensity Score Methods for Estimating Treatment Effects Using Observational Data
Peter Austin, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, and University of Toronto, Canada

 

Workshop 5 (Part I) Introduction to Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing for Outcomes Measurement Instruments (Part I)

8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
Salon II

Organizer(s): Laura Lee Johnson, NIH

Research studies and clinicians increasingly collect self-reported health measures. However, the development and interpretation of the measurements are often overlooked. Many new patient reported outcome (PRO) instruments use modern measurement theory, offering advantages in instrument creation and application. Attendees will become familiar with basic item response theory (IRT) terminology, what it is, how it works, and how IRT compares to classical test theory. Speakers also will discuss the fundamentals of computer adaptive testing (CAT) and what is required to create and administer CAT. Key points and the challenges and opportunities for using PRO instruments in health policy research will be illustrated with examples.

8:30 AM

Introduction to Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing for Outcomes Measurement Instruments (Part I)
Karon Cook, University of Washington; Laura Lee Johnson, NIH; Irene Katzan, Cleveland Clinic and The MetroHealth System; Nan Rothrock, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

 

Workshop 7 Quantile Regression

8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Brian Neelon, Duke University

Quantile regression seeks to provide a more complete picture of regression problems by analyzing all the conditional quantiles of the response in terms of interpretable linear models. This is especially useful when population heterogeneity leads to variation in the regression parameters as the quantile probability changes. The basic ideas will be presented through examples and the underlying basis for quantile regression will be summarized. Recent work on censored regression quantiles (for survival models) will be presented.

8:30 AM

Quantile Regression
Stephen Portnoy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Break

10:15 AM - 10:30 AM
Pre-function

 

Workshop 2 Estimating Treatment Effects Using Longitudinal Data

10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Miguel Hernan, Harvard School of Public Health

The availability and use of observational data---electronic medical records, claims databases, registries, etc.---is increasing in medical research. However, a valid estimation of the causal effects of treatment from observational data requires strong assumptions regarding confounding and other potential biases. Estimating the effects of time-varying treatments in the presence of time-varying confounding factors also requires the use of appropriate analytic methods. The goal of this workshop is to describe the implementation of several techniques for the estimation of causal treatment effects in longitudinal observational data. We will discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of inverse probability weighting of marginal structural models and the parametric g-formula.

10:30 AM

Estimating Treatment Effects Using Longitudinal Data
Miguel Hernan, Harvard School of Public Health

 

Workshop 5 (Part II) Introduction to Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing for Outcomes Measurement Instruments (Part II)

10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Salon II

Organizer(s): Laura Lee Johnson, NIH

Research studies and clinicians increasingly collect self-reported health measures. However, the development and interpretation of the measurements are often overlooked. Many new patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments use modern measurement theory, offering advantages in instrument creation and application. Attendees will become familiar with basic item response theory (IRT) terminology, what it is, how it works, and how IRT compares to classical test theory. Speakers also will discuss the fundamentals of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and what is required to create and administer CAT. Key points and a description of how PRO instruments can be used in health policy research will be illustrated. Examples of implementation problems focused on system integration, computer-based testing and CAT/IRT also will be discussed.

10:30 AM

Introduction to Item Response Theory and Computerized Adaptive Testing for Outcomes Measurement Instruments (Part II)
Karon Cook, University of Washington; Laura Lee Johnson, NIH; Irene Katzan, Cleveland Clinic and The MetroHealth System; Nan Rothrock, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

 

Workshop 8 Multiple Comparisons for Making Decisions

10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Bo Lu, The Ohio State University

This course is about using multiple comparisons to make decisions in clinical and genomic studies. We will discuss the construction of multiple tests using the fundamental principle of Partitioning, using Holm’s method and Hochberg’s method as examples. This will include subtle issues in the control of Family-wise Error Rate, generalized Family-wise Error Rate, and False Discovery Rate. Applications draw from studies involving bioequivalence, multiple endpoints, and personalized medicine.

10:30 AM

Multiple Comparisons for Making Decisions
Jason Hsu, The Ohio State University; Bo Lu, The Ohio State University

 

Lunch on Your Own

12:15 PM - 1:30 PM

 

Workshop 3 Instrumental Variable Methods for Accounting for Selection and Survival Bias in Observational Studies

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Therese A. Stukel, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and University of Toronto

Confounding frequently occurs in observational studies of the effects of treatments or exposures on health outcomes. While standard statistical methods can remove bias due to measured confounding, non-standard methods are required to remove bias due to unmeasured confounding. This workshop will address several statistical issues in estimating treatment effects when key confounders are unobserved or unobservable. Issues in the design and analysis of observational studies when estimating treatment effects using observational data will be highlighted. We will give an overview of analysis methods for removing confounding, including standard regression and propensity-based methods. We will introduce instrumental variable (IV) methods, providing an overview, properties, strength and validity of a proposed instrument, interpretation and analysis techniques. We will review examples of good and poor IV analyses in the health services literature, with an in-depth review of a study of the effects of invasive cardiac care on AMI mortality. Finally, we will assess which types of studies are more amenable to which techniques and will design a study of antipsychotic medications on patient mortality using varying techniques.

1:30 PM

Instrumental Variable Methods for Accounting for Selection and Survival Bias in Observational Studies
Therese A. Stukel, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and University of Toronto

 

Workshop 6 (Part I) Interpreting Change and Responder Analyses for Patient-Responder Outcomes (Part I)

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Salon II

Organizer(s): Joseph C. Cappelleri, Pfizer, Inc.

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures used for labeling and promotional claims must have: 1) evidence documenting their responsiveness; and 2) interpretation guidelines (e.g., responder definition) to be most useful as effectiveness endpoints in clinical trials. The recommended approach is to estimate the responder definition based on anchor-based methods, which will be discussed during the workshop. However, this workshop will also discuss how distribution-based methods can provide some insights on interpreting the amount of change that signifies an important change in PROs. Confidence in a specific responder change threshold evolves over time and is confirmed by additional research evidence, including clinical trial experience; the responder change threshold may vary by population and context, and no one responder change threshold will be valid for all study applications involving a PRO instrument. During this workshop, the speakers will explain how to demonstrate and identify thresholds for specific study populations in an effort to pursue labeling and promotional claims.

1:30 PM

Interpreting Change and Responder Analyses for Patient-Responder Outcomes (Part I)
Richard Gershon, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine ; Laura Lee Johnson, NIH; Irene Katzan, Cleveland Clinic and The MetroHealth System; Nan Rothrock, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

 

Workshop 9 Network Meta-Analysis

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Christopher Schmid, Tufts University Medical Center

This workshop will describe techniques for meta-analysis of data when it is desired to compare more than two treatments in a network. Emphasis will be on Bayesian models which allow for ranking of the comparative efficacy of treatments through calculation of the relevant posterior probabilities. Knowledge of the motivation for meta-analysis as well as basic statistical models for combining data of different types will be assumed.

1:30 PM

Network Meta-Analysis
Christopher Schmid, Tufts University Medical Center

 

Break

3:15 PM - 3:30 PM
Pre-function

 

Workshop 10 Evaluation of Diagnostic and Predictive Accuracy of Medical Tests and Biomarkers

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Andrew Zhou, HSR&D Center of Excellence, VA Puget South Health Care System, and University of Washington

Diagnostic tests play a pivotal role in medicine, often determining what additional diagnostic tests, treatments, and interventions are needed and ultimately affecting patients' outcomes. This workshop provides a comprehensive approach to designing and analyzing diagnostic accuracy studies, so as to aid clinicians in understanding these studies and in generalizing study results to their patient populations. The basis for the course is the upcoming second edition of "Statistical Methods in Diagnostic Medicine", by Zhou, Obuchowski and McClish. We define various measures of diagnostic accuracy, describe strategies for designing diagnostic accuracy studies, and present statistical methods for estimating and comparing tests' accuracies, calculating sample size, and synthesizing the literature for meta-analysis. We then present more advanced statistical methods for describing a test's accuracy when accuracy is affected by patient characteristics, for analyzing multi-reader studies, for correcting for verification bias or imperfect gold standard bias, and for performing meta-analyses. The attendees are assumed to have a basic understanding of maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods as well as generalized linear models.

3:30 PM

Evaluation of Diagnostic and Predictive Accuracy of Medical Tests and Biomarkers
Andrew Zhou, HSR&D Center of Excellence, VA Puget South Health Care System, and University of Washington

 

Workshop 4 Multiple Imputation Using Chained Equations (MICE)

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Elizabeth Stuart, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

This workshop will discuss multiple imputation using chained equations (MICE), a flexible procedure for creating multiple imputations to handle missing data. MICE can handle many data complexities, such as bounds and survey skip patterns, and can be implemented in large datasets. After providing a brief introduction to missing data and multiple imputation in general, this workshop will discuss the MICE method and provide references for software implementation.

3:30 PM

Multiple Imputation Using Chained Equations (MICE)
Elizabeth Stuart, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

 

Workshop 6 (Part II) Interpreting Change and Responder Analyses for Patient-Responder Outcomes (Part II)

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
Salon II

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures used for labeling and promotional claims must have: 1) evidence documenting their responsiveness; and 2) interpretation guidelines (e.g., responder definition) to be most useful as effectiveness endpoints in clinical trials. The recommended approach is to estimate the responder definition based on anchor-based methods, which will be discussed during the workshop. However, this workshop will also discuss how distribution-based methods can provide some insights on interpreting the amount of change that signifies an important change in PROs. Confidence in a specific responder change threshold evolves over time and is confirmed by additional research evidence, including clinical trial experience; the responder change threshold may vary by population and context, and no one responder change threshold will be valid for all study applications involving a PRO instrument. During this workshop, the speakers will explain how to demonstrate and identify thresholds for specific study populations in an effort to pursue labeling and promotional claims.

3:30 PM

Interpreting Change and Responder Analyses for Patient-Responder Outcomes (Part II)
Joseph C. Cappelleri, Pfizer Inc; Lisa A. Kammerman, Food & Drug Administration; Kathleen W. Wyrwich, United Biosource Corporation

 

Poster Session I & Welcome Reception

5:30 PM - 6:30 PM
Pre-function

Teaching statistics in developing nations
Mark Griffin, Australian Development Agency for Statistics & Information Systems

The impact of reference pricing system on brand name’s prices: the case of Tunisia
Ines Ayadi, Universite Paris Dauphine

A Comparison of Variable Importance Measures for Patient-Reported Outcomes
Tolulope T. Sajobi, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan

Strategies for financing healthcare costs over the long term
Robert D. Lieberthal, Jefferson School of Population Health

High frequency evidence on variation in spending growth
Robert D. Lieberthal, Jefferson School of Population Health

A Spatial Poisson Hurdle Model for Exploring Geographic Variation in Emergency Department Visits
Brian Neelon, Duke University

Exploratory Discriminant Analysis in Phase 2 Clinical Trials to investigate Treatment Effect Heterogeneity
Lev Sverdlov, Merck Pharmaceutical Inc.

Policy implications resulting from connecting survival models to the underlying biological processes
Sidney Klawansky, Harvard School of Public Health

Sequential Testing for Intraclass Correlation Coefficient in Inter-Rater Reliability Studies
Mei Jin, George Washington University

Identifying predictors of cancer related quality of life using Bayesian model averaging (BMA)
George Kypriotakis, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Louis Stokes VAMD; CWRU School of Medicine

Assessing the sensitivity of net monetary benefits using non-linear models
Elizabeth A. Handorf, University of Pennsylvania

To balance or not to balance: a study of balancing propensity scores weighting and regression to assess the effect of being HIV positive on outcomes among heterosexually active homeless men
Daniela Golinelli, RAND Statistics Group

How well does AIC perform in partially observed data?
Ashok Chaurasia, Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut

Assessing the privacy of randomized vector valued queries to a database using the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve
Ofer Harel, Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut

The Factors that Affect the Frequency of Vital Sign Monitoring During Times of Emergency Department Crowding
Kimberly D Johnson, Department of Veterans Affairs, Case Western Reserve University

Bivariate Spatial Analysis of Birth Weight and Gestational Age
Brian Neelon, Duke University

Split Sample Methods in Observational Studies with Choice of Multiple Hypotheses
Kai Zhang, University of Pennsylvania

Optimal Designs in the N of 1 Trials
Yin Li, University of Alberta

How much compliance is enough? Estimating the Complier Average Causal Effect (CACE) for treatment efficacy with different definitions of compliance
Scott F Grey, Kent State University

Need for Strategic Health and Intervention Concept Changes with Current Epidemiologic Trends in Alcoholic Population
Vatsalya Vatsalya, NIAAA NIH

Hierarchical Longitudinal Models of Relationships in Social Networks
Sudeshna Paul, Harvard Medical School

Ohio Electronic Health Records Survey: Increasing Response Rates Surveying Medical Practices
Daniel Weston II, The Ohio Colleges of Medicine

 

Thu, Oct 6

Poster Session II & Continential Breakfast

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
Pre-function

Financial health equity. Intervention for balance and financial stability of national health providing institutions, , health promoters and insurers.
Itzjak Kadar, University professor

Reimbursement price reduction and pharmaceutical firm production behavior in Korea
Jaeheon Heo, Seoul Cyber University

Bias In Variance Estimation Using Re-Sampling Of Longitudinal And Nested Administrative Health Data.
Bassam Dahman, Virginia Commonwealth University

The power to identify patient subgroup effects with meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials
Stephanie Ann Kovalchik, National Cancer Institute

Analyzing State-Based Silver Alert Programs: The Case of North Carolina
Takashi Yamashita, Miami University

Two Sample Distribution-Free Inference Based on Partially Rank Ordered Set Sample
Jinguo Gao, Ms

A Hotel Model for Studying the Effect of State Policies on Nursing Home Hospitalizations
Orna Intrator, Brown Univesrity and Providence VAMC

Estimating prevalence of multiple chronic conditions based on health behaviors and its regional differences in the United State, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2009
Jihyung Shin, Florida State University, Department of Statistics

Effectiveness of adolescent substance abuse treatments: An application using multinomial propensity scores
Megan Schuler, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, RAND

A Bayesian Hierarchical Model to Estimate State-Level Support for Health Care Reform from National Opinion Data
Richard Gonzales, Harvard University

Modeling the volume-outcome relationship using high-dimensional patient-level covariate data across many hospitals
Edward H. Kennedy, VA Center for Clinical Management Research

Proper Variance Computation for Estimates from MEPS Event Files
Sadeq R Chowdhury, AHRQ

Bayesian Semi-parametric Joint Modeling of Item Response Model
Bin Huang, Cincinnati Children's Hospital

Sensitivity analysis for modeling nonignorable missingness in randomized controlled trials
Mulugeta Gebregziabher, MUSC

Using propensity scores to assess the relationship between HIV status and acute myocardial infarction in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study
Donna Almario Doebler, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health

Are Provider Communication Constructs the Same Across English and Spanish?
Gerald K Arnold, American Board of Internal Medicine

A Novel Approach to Quantify Risk for SUD: Computerized Adaptive Testing
Levent Kirisci, University of Pittsburgh

Predictors for longitudinal trajectory of Bone Mineral Density in Pediatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients
Lily Siok Hoon Lim, The Hospital for Sick Children

Quantile Regression Analysis of the Effect of Health Maintenance Organization Enrollment on Medical Expenditures
Lisa M. Lines, University of Massachusetts Medical School

Semiparametric Regression Inference for Age-Stage at Diagnosis Relationship in Cancer Studies
Chen Hu, Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan

Validity of Using Census-Based Area Level Socioeconomic Information As a Proxy for Individual Level Socioeconomic Confounders in Instrumental Variables Regression
Yenchih Hsu, University of Pennsylvania

 

Conference Registration

7:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Pre-function

 

Welcome and Keynote Address

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Salon I

Chair(s): Thomas E. Love, Case Western Reserve University; Dr. A. James O'Malley, Harvard Medical School

 

Break

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Pre-function

 

Session 11 Invited New Developments in the Analysis of Incomplete Longitudinal Data

10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Ofer Harel, University of Connecticut; Recai Murat Yucel, State University of New York at Albany

Chair(s): Recai Murat Yucel, State University of New York at Albany

10:35 AM

Informative priors and sensitivity analysis for longitudinal clinical trials with dropout
Joseph W. Hogan, Brown University

11:00 AM

Relevant, accessible sensitivity analysis using multiple imputation
James R. Carpenter, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

11:25 AM

Multiply-robust adjustment for dependent drop-out in longitudinal studies
Eric Tchetgen, Harvard University

Discussant(s): Roderick J. Little, University of Michigan

 

Session 12 Invited Spatial Methods for Health Policy Research

10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
Salon II

Organizer(s): Brian Neelon, Duke University

Chair(s): Brian Neelon, Duke University

10:35 AM

Latent spatial grouping in Bayesian AFT modeling
Andrew Booth Lawson, Medical University of South Carolina

11:00 AM

Identification in Bayesian disease mapping and spatial regression
Ying C. MacNab, University of British Columbia

11:25 AM

Spatial Path Models with Multiple Indicators and Causes: Population Psychiatric Outcomes in US Counties
Peter Congdon, Queen Mary University of London

11:50 AM

Bayesian spatial quantile regression for projecting effects of climate change on onzone concentration
Brian Reich, North Carolina State University, Department of Statistics

 

Session 13 Topic-Contributed Papers Propensity Scores, Optimal Matching and Related Approaches

10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Thomas E. Love, Case Western Reserve University

Chair(s): Thomas E. Love, Case Western Reserve University

10:35 AM

Contrasting evidence within and between institutions that supply treatment in an observational study of alternative forms of anesthesia
Jose R. Zubizarreta, Department of Statistics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

10:55 AM

The Use of Propensity Scores to Estimate Sample Selection Error in Observational Data
Taylor R. Pressler, Ohio State University College of Medicine

11:15 AM

Going Beyond a Pre-Post Design: Propensity Score Matching in a Cost Savings Framework for Nurse Care Management Program Evaluation
Shannon Marie Elizabeth Murphy, Johns Hopkins HealthCare LLC

11:35 AM

Using Propensity Score Analysis to Assess the Effectiveness of Social Marketing Campaigns in Healthcare: An Example from Medicare Open Enrollment
Frank Funderburk, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

11:55 AM

Augmenting Propensity Score Matching with Outcome Information
Mike Baiocchi, Stanford

 

Session 14 Contributed Papers Survey Methods and Related Topics

10:30 AM - 12:15 PM
The Plaza

Chair(s): Marc N. Elliott, RAND Corporation

10:35 AM

Cumulative Distribution Plots to Enhance Interpretation of Treatment Differences on the Self-Esteem And Relationship Questionnaire for Men with Erectile Dysfunction
Joseph C. Cappelleri, Pfizer Inc

10:55 AM

Combining Information from Multiple Complex Surveys
Qi Dong, Program in Survey Methodology, University of Michigan

11:15 AM

Health Characteristics of Medicare traditional fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage enrollees: 1999-2004 NHANES linked to 2007 Medicare data
Jennifer D. Parker, National Center for Health Statistics

11:35 AM

A Semi-Parametric Approach to Account for Complex Designs in Multiple Imputation
Hanzhi Zhou, University of Michigan

11:55 AM

Outliers in Non-Parametric Estimation of Treatment Effects
Darwin Ugarte, Economic School of Louvain, Centre for Research in the Economics of Development (CRED), FUNDP. Namur

 

Lunch on Your Own

12:15 PM - 1:30 PM

 

Session 15 Invited Investigating Treatment Effect Heterogeneity in Mental Health Research

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Elizabeth Stuart, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Chair(s): Elizabeth Stuart, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

1:35 PM

Heterogeneity of the impact of mental health parity
Frank B. Yoon, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

1:55 PM

Tree-structured analysis of differential treatment effects
Joseph Kang, Northwestern University

2:15 PM

Comparative Effectiveness of Medication vs. CBT in Depressed Low-income Women
Juned Siddique, Northwestern University

2:35 PM

Using Structural Nested Mean Models to Examine Time-varying Moderators of the Effect of Substance Use Treatment
Daniel Almirall, University of Michigan

Discussant(s): Thomas R. Belin, UCLA

 

Session 16 Invited Analytic Challenges in Complex Longitudinal Data from VA-related Health Services Research

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Salon II

Organizer(s): Maren K. Olsen, Durham Epidemiology Research & Information Center (ERIC)

Chair(s): Maren K. Olsen, Durham Epidemiology Research & Information Center (ERIC)

1:35 PM

Longitudinal Analysis of Real-time Momentary Pain Data in a Cohort of Osteoarthritis Patients
Cynthia J. Coffman, Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VAMC

2:00 PM

Mood Changes Associated with Smoking in Adolescents: An Application of a Mixed-Effects Location Scale Model for Longitudinal Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) Data
Donald Hedeker, University of Illinois at Chicago

2:25 PM

Sample Size Determination for Longitudinal Binary Data
Kush Kapur, Hines VA Hospital

2:50 PM

Analyzing VA Data - Promises and Challenges
Siu Lui Hui, Indiana University

 

Session 17 Topic Contributed Papers Database and Simulation-Based Methods for Decision-Making

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Kelly H. Zou, Pfizer Inc

Chair(s): Joseph C. Cappelleri, Pfizer, Inc.

1:35 PM

Model based drug development: A clinical pharmacologist’s approach to quantitative decision-making
Scott Marshall, Pfizer Ltd.

1:55 PM

Indirect Treatment Comparisons Using Simulation
K. Jack Ishak, United BioSource Corporation

2:15 PM

Application of Classification Tree Modeling in the Development of Adult Vehicular Trauma Triage Decision Rules
Jane Zhang, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

2:35 PM

Identifying subjects with low adherence to trial visit schedules in the long-term clinical trial
Ali Falahati, Novo Nordisk A/S

2:55 PM

Detecting data fabrication in clinical trials from cluster analysis perspective
Martin O. Carlsson, Pfizer Inc

 

Session 18 Contributed Papers Modeling Costs in Medicine and Health Care

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
The Plaza

Organizer(s): Lei Liu, University of Virginia

Chair(s): Joseph W. Hogan, Brown University

1:35 PM

Generalized Semiparametric Models with Unknown Variance Function, with Application to Medical Cost Data
Lei Liu, University of Virginia

1:55 PM

International evidence on medical spending
Robert D. Lieberthal, Jefferson School of Population Health

2:15 PM

Perverse Perceptions of the Impact of Pay for Performance on Healthcare Disparities
James P. Scanlan, James P. Scanlan, Attorney at Law

2:35 PM

Jointly Modeling Healthcare Costs
Joanne K. Daggy, Indiana University School of Medicine

2:55 PM

Joint Modeling of Medical Expenditure and Survival in Complex Sample Surveys
Huiping Xu, Indiana University School of Medicine

 

Break

3:15 PM - 3:30 PM
Pre-function

 

Session 19 Invited Innovations in Randomized Experiments & Quasi-Experimental Studies in Health Policy

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Amelia M. Haviland, RAND Corporation

Chair(s): Amelia M. Haviland, RAND Corporation

3:35 PM

Analysis of post-treatment outcomes in group therapy studies under open enrollment
Susan Paddock, RAND Corporation

3:55 PM

Does the association between exposure to smoking in movies and adolescents’ desire to smoke depend on how smoking is portrayed: A randomized lab study with matched movie clips
Claude Setodji, RAND Corporation

4:15 PM

Evaluating the comparative effectiveness of promising treatment programs for adolescents in face of differential follow-up
Beth Ann Griffin, RAND Corporation

4:35 PM

Assessing effects of survey mode on healthcare survey responses through experimental manipulation of order
Alan M. Zaslavsky, Harvard Medical School, Dept. of Health Care Policy

4:55 PM

A randomized experiment to increase response rates to a healthcare survey among individuals with a high predicted probability of preferring Spanish
Marc N. Elliott, RAND Corporation

 

Session 20 Invited Bayesian Clinical Trials: Using Priors and Planning for Post-Regulatory Translation

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
Salon II

Organizer(s): C. Daniel Mullins, University of Maryland

Chair(s): Kelly H. Zou, Pfizer Inc

3:35 PM

Bayesian Medical Device Clinical Studies in the Regulatory Setting
Telba Z. Irony, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA

4:00 PM

Bayesian Meta-Analyses for Comparative Effectiveness and Coverage Decisionsand
Scott Berry, Berry Consultants

4:25 PM

Improving the coherence of sequential imputation via calibration
Recai Murat Yucel, State University of New York at Albany

4:50 PM

Commensurate Priors for Incorporating Historical Information in Clinical Trials using General and Generalized Linear Models
Brian P. Hobbs, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

 

Session 21 Topic Contributed Panel Panel Discussion: What Does it Mean to be a Meaningful User of Electronic Health Records?

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Laura Lee Johnson, NIH

Chair(s): Laura Lee Johnson, NIH

3:35 PM

Panel Discussion: What Does it Mean to be a Meaningful User of Electronic Health Records?
Randall D. Cebul, Case Western Reserve University; Lara Jehi, Cleveland Clinic; Irene Katzan, Cleveland Clinic and The MetroHealth System; Deborah Miller, Cleveland Clinic

 

Session 22 Contributed Papers Longitudinal and Survival Analysis

3:30 PM - 5:15 PM
The Plaza

Chair(s): Douglas Gunzler, Case Western Reserve University

3:35 PM

Estimating Insurance Spell Dynamics Using Longitudinal Survey Data
John A. Graves, Harvard University & Vanderbilt University

3:55 PM

A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Bivariate Sparse Longitudinal Data
Kiranmoy Das, Penn State University, Statistics department

4:15 PM

Joint Modeling of Longitudinal Patient Reported Outcomes and Survival Data with Application to an Oncology Clinical Trial
Ping Wang, Eli Lilly and Company

4:35 PM

Learning in hierarchical Bayesian models for longitudinal and survival outcomes
Laura A. Hatfield, Harvard Medical School

4:55 PM

The effect of pre-hospital ADL trajectory on post-hospital ADL trajectory and mortality
Robin L. Kruse, University of Missouri

 

Reception at House of Blues Cleveland

6:15 PM - 8:15 PM
Offsite - House of Blues Cleveland

 

Fri, Oct 7

HPSS Executive Committee Breakfast Meeting (By Invitation Only)

7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
The Boardroom

 

Conference Registration

7:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Pre-function

 

HPSS Awards and Plenary Speaker

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Salon I

Chair(s): Thomas E. Love, Case Western Reserve University; Dr. A. James O'Malley, Harvard Medical School

 

Break

10:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Pre-function

 

Session 23 Invited Recent Developments in Modeling Random Effects in Health Outcomes Data

10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Yulei He, Harvard Medical School

Chair(s): Christopher Schmid, Tufts University Medical Center

10:20 AM

What to shrink? Random Effects in Discrete Data Meta-Analysis
Eloise Kaizar, Ohio State University

10:45 AM

Classifying hospitals on process performance measures using flexible random-effects models
Yulei He, Harvard Medical School

11:10 AM

Center-adjusted inference for a nonparametric Bayesian random effect distribution
Yisheng Li, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Discussant(s): Donald Hedeker, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Session 24 Invited Innovative Methods of Random Assignment

10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Salon II

Organizer(s): Ben B. Hansen, University of Michigan

Chair(s): Ben B. Hansen, University of Michigan

10:20 AM

Integrating experimental-design principles into community-partnered participatory research on disseminating evidence-based depression care in underserved urban areas
Thomas R. Belin, UCLA

10:40 AM

Matched randomization in RCTs where subjects trickle in one at a time or in small batches
Robert Alan Greevy, Vanderbilt University

11:00 AM

Alternatives to the Pocock-Simon method for trickle-in random assignment
Ryan T. Moore, University of California, Berkeley

11:20 AM

Propensity Score Matching in Randomized Clinical Trials
Zhenzhen Xu, Abbott Laboratories

Discussant(s): Thomas E. Love, Case Western Reserve University

 

Session 25 Topic Contributed Papers Applied Topics in Causal Inference

10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
The Riverview Room

Organizer(s): Dr. A. James O'Malley, Harvard Medical School

Chair(s): Laura A. Hatfield, Harvard Medical School

10:20 AM

Accountability Research for Air Quality Regulations Using Principal Stratification
Corwin Zigler, Harvard School of Public Health

10:40 AM

Instrumental Variables Methodology for Estimation of Peer Effects
A. James O'Malley, Harvard Medical School

11:00 AM

Defining the Study Population for an Observational Study to Ensure Sufficient Overlap: a Tree Approach
Dylan Small, University of Pennsylvania

11:20 AM

Assessing the Causal Effect of Treatment Dosages in the Presence of Self-Selection
Xin Gao, University of Michigan, Department of Biostatistics

11:40 AM

What is the right amount of utilization in Home Health Care?
Iordan Slavov, Visiting Nurse Service of New York

 

Session 26 Contributed Papers Effective Statistical Design

10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
The Plaza

Chair(s): Juned Siddique, Northwestern University

10:20 AM

Health disparities between bachelors and associates degree holders with similar job quality.
Janet E. Rosenbaum, University of Maryland Population Center

10:40 AM

A comparison of estimators for the harms of repeat cancer screening for use in health policy decision making
Rebecca A. Hubbard, Group Health Research Institute

11:00 AM

Predictive inference for identifying outliers in health care providers
Michael Joseph Racz, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

11:20 AM

Capture-Recapture Techniques to Evaluate Completeness of Administrative Health Databases for Chronic Disease Research: Effects of Misclassification Error
Lisa M. Lix, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan

11:40 AM

A new dependence parameter approach to improve the design of cluster randomized trials with binary outcomes
Catherine M. Crespi, University of California Los Angeles

 

Lunch on Your Own

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

 

Workshop 11 The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS): A National Data Resource to Inform Health Policy

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Salon I

Organizer(s): Jeffrey Rhoades, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

The purpose of this Workshop is to facilitate the use of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component (MEPS HC) public use data files by the health services research community. To meet this objective, participants are provided with a general overview of the MEPS, a description of available data files, information about on-line data tools, and some examples of the type of research projects the MEPS data can support. Major changes have taken place in the Nation's health care delivery system over the last decade. The most notable is the recent passage of the Affordable Care Act. Also consider the rapid expansion of managed care arrangements such as health maintenance organizations, preferred provider organizations, and other provider networks that seek to minimize increases in health care costs. The MEPS is a vital national data resource designed to continually provide health service researchers, policymakers, health care administrators, businesses, and others with timely, comprehensive information about health care use and costs in the United States. Newly released MEPS public use files provide analysts with opportunities to create unique analytic files for policy relevant analysis in the field of health services research, such as access to care and health disparities. In order to capture the unparalleled scope and detail of the MEPS HC, analysts need to understand the complexities of MEPS data files and data file linkages. This workshop will provide the knowledge necessary to formulate research plans utilizing the various MEPS HC files and linkage capabilities.

1:30 PM

The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS): A National Data Resource to Inform Health Policy
Jeffrey Rhoades, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality