ASA Stat. Ed. Section Newsletter - V14 N1

Newsletter of the Section on Statistical Education of the American Statistical Association


Contents of Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009):
  • Report from the Chair
  • Editors
  • Mark Your Calendar
  • Report from the JSM Stat Ed Program Chair
  • JSM Roundtables Program Report
  • Advanced Placement Statistics 2009
  • SILC: Statistics Instructors Lost in Cyberspace
  • United States Conference on Teaching Statistics (USCOTS 09)
  • News from the Journal of Statistics Education
  • Teaching Statistics
  • Technology Innovations in Statistics Education
  • Statistics Education Research Journal
  • Announcement and Solicitation of Nominations for the Waller Education Award for Contributions to the Teaching of Elementary Statistics
  • NSF's Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program, Track 1: A Good Place to Start for Submitting Statistics Education Grant Proposals
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    Report from the Chair

    Bob delMas
    University of Minnesota
    delma001@umn.edu

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    Serving as chair of the Section on Statistical Education is an exciting opportunity, and I have already been busy having submitted letters of support for several Strategic Initiative proposals related to statistics education. I want to thank everyone on the Sectionís Executive Committee for the time they took to read over the proposals and provide feedback. I also want to thank Jessica Utts and Linda Young for their guidance as past chairs and willingness to answer my questions. I am also very fortunate to have another past chair, Joan Garfield, just down the hall from my office!

    At this time I want to recognize and thank the individuals who have completed their terms and rotated off the Executive Committee:
    Jessica Utts (2007 Chair)
    Jackie Miller (2008 Program Chair)
    Carolyn Cuff (Council of Sections Representative)
    Rob Gould (Member at Large)
    Norean Radtke Sharpe (Member at Large)

    And to welcome the new Executive Committee who start their terms this year:
    Tisha Hooks (2010 Program Chair)
    Deb Nolan (Council of Sections Representative)
    Nick Horton (Member at Large)

    One of the major developments for the Section was the revision of our Mission Statement and the creation of a set of Strategic Objectives, both of which have been posted to the Section website (http://www.amstat.org/sections/educ/index.html). I want to thank the Executive Committee members for their hard work in drafting these items, and all of the Section members who took the time to read through the documents and provide feedback. Special thanks goes to Linda Young who oversaw and orchestrated the meetings and obtained the needed funding, and to Jessica Utts who offered her leadership, collected the feedback from Section members, and incorporated it into the final versions of both documents. Both the Mission Statement and Strategic Objectives provide guidance to the Executive Committee as we consider requests for endorsements and funding, and we have already put them to good use.

    One of the projects I will work on this year is a revision of the Section website. I will be working with Jackie Dietz and Carmen Acuna to streamline the information on the website so that it is more aligned with the needs and interests of Section members. We have already started a discussion about possible changes, and we appreciate any and all input from Section members.

    I am looking forward to the year ahead, and thank you for the opportunity to serve the Section on Statistical Education as chair.

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    EDITORS

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    Comments and suggestions for the improvement of the newsletter are most welcome, and should be sent to a member of the editorial board.

    Joan Garfield
    Department of Educational Psychology
    University of Minnesota
    332 Burton Hall
    128 Pillsbury Dr., S.E.
    Minneapolis MN 55455
    (612) 625-0337
    Fax: (612) 624-8241
    jbg@umn.edu

    E. Jacquelin Dietz
    Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Meredith College
    3800 Hillsborough Street
    Raleigh, NC 27607-5298
    (919) 760-8234
    Fax: (919) 760-8141
    dietzjac@meredith.edu

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    MARK YOUR CALENDAR

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    June 25-27, 2009
    United States Conference on Teaching Statistics
    The Ohio State University
    http://www.causeweb.org/uscots/

    August 1-6, 2009
    Joint Statistical Meetings
    Washington, DC, USA
    http://www.amstat.org/meetings/jsm/2009/index.cfm

    July 11-16, 2010
    8th International Conference on Teaching Statistics
    Ljubljana, Slovenia
    http://icots8.org/

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    Report from the JSM Stat Ed Program Chair

    Peter Westfall, 2009 Program Chair, Section on Statistical Education

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    We will have a very good set of invited, topic contributed, contributed, and poster sessions lined up for Statistics Education in JSM 2009, extending across all days, including even Sunday and Thursday.

    We have four interesting invited sessions for JSM 2009:

    Sunday, 8/2, 4-5:50 PM, Teaching Bayesian Statistics to Non-Statisticians (Chair: Joe Gonzalez)

    Monday, 8/3, 2:00-3:50 PM, Statistics in the "Research Methods" Courses (Chair: Deborah Dawson)

    Tuesday 8/4, 10:30 AM -12:20 PM, Stirring the Pot: Radical Ideas in Statistics Education (Chair: Lorrie Hoffman)

    Thursday, 8/6, 10:30 AM -12:20 PM, Who is Teaching the Statistics Courses? (Chair: Katherine Halvorsen)

    There are many excellent topic contributed, regular contributed, and poster sessions as well. But at this writing, details are not available. Due to limitations, some who may have wanted a presentation had to be converted to a poster. This information is still up in the air, as the program has not been completely set and there are details to work out. If you have any questions, feel free to contact Peter.Westfall@ttu.edu, and see you at JSM2009!

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    JSM Roundtables Program Report

    Tisha Hooks, Winona State University

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    Thanks to several gracious discussion leaders, we have an exciting slate of roundtables for JSM 2009 in Washington, D.C. We are planning to have one coffee and three lunches on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. The topics are as follows:

    Coffee roundtables:

    Lunch roundtables:

    Please keep these roundtables in mind when you register for JSM. And, if you've already registered, add a roundtable to your registration! If you have any questions, please contact me at thooks@winona.edu.

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    Advanced Placement Statistics 2009

    Christine Franklin, Chief Faculty Reader
    University of Georgia

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    The 2009 AP Statistics Reading is quickly approaching. The reading will be held in Louisville, KY, June 5-11. We are expecting approximately 120,000 exams and planning for a total of 515 readers. Numerous evening activities are planned for the reading: the opening party, new reader (the acorns) gathering, College Board night, Best Practices night, Stats Papers night, and the closing party. A very special evening at the reading is the Professional Night. This yearís speaker will be Tom Moore from Grinnell College. Tom is a national leader in Statistics Education. While at the reading, he will be recognized as the recipient of the 2008 Mu Sigma Rho National Honor Society Statistical Education Award.

    If you are a new reader, Jason Molesky has set up a website with very useful information about the reading experience (itís also a great website for experienced readers). The web link is: http://web.mac.com/statsmonkey/APStats_at_LSHS/AP_Reading_FAQ.html. If you havenít signed up to be a reader and are interested, go to the AP Central website and use the online application link to submit your application. If you applied in recent months and havenít received an invitation for 2009, know that you are on the waiting list in the database for future readings.

    Iím looking forward to June in Louisville.

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    SILC: Statistics Instructors Lost in Cyberspace

    Michelle Everson, University of Minnesota

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    Do you teach statistics in the online environment?

    Have you ever wanted to talk to other online statistics instructors about your experiences teaching in this environment?

    A new discussion group called "Statistics Instructors Lost in Cyberspace" has been set up using Google Groups, and we invite online statistics instructors to join this group by coming to http://groups.google.com/group/onlinestats. This group was set up in order to connect online statistics instructors and provide a place for them to share ideas and resources. It's also meant to be a place where those of us who teach online can support one another, collaborate, and commiserate. Teaching online can pose many unique challenges and opportunities for the statistics instructor, and sometimes it's nice to share these things with others who understand, and to get new ideas about the many things that can be done in the online statistics course.

    If you would like more information about this group, please contact Michelle Everson at gaddy001@umn.edu. Those interested in teaching online may also want to become involved in the USCOTS cluster "Teaching Statistics in the Online World." If you will be attending USCOTS this year, you can sign up for this cluster at the time you register for the conference. The cluster will be co-led by Michelle Everson from the University of Minnesota and David Zeitler from Grand Valley State University.

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    United States Conference on Teaching Statistics (USCOTS 09)

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    The third biennial United States Conference on Teaching Statistics (USCOTS 09) will be held on June 25-27, 2009 at the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, hosted by CAUSE, the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education. The target audience for USCOTS is teachers of undergraduate and AP statistics, from any discipline or type of institution. Teachers of statistics at two year colleges and those planning a career in statistics education are especially encouraged to attend.

    The theme of USCOTS 09 is "Letting Go to Grow." Are we trying to fit in too much to have a "good" statistics course? Can we retool and rethink our courses to better meet our goals? What should we let go of in order to grow?

    USCOTS 09 is a 'hands-on' conference with plenary sessions from leaders in statistics education, working breakout sessions, interactive idea exchange forums, and networking opportunities. The distinguished plenary speakers for USCOTS 09 are Dani Ben-Zvi, George Cobb, Peter Ewell, Chris Wild, and Ronald Wasserstein.

    USCOTS offers a unique opportunity of participating in on-going interest groups called clusters. Cluster group topics are Statistics Education Research, Study of Fun, Teaching Statistics in the On-Line World, and Student Attitudes. Participants in these interest groups will meet at varying times before, during and following the conference. Details about each interest group and how to become a cluster participant are available at http://www.causeweb.org/uscots/cluster/.

    In connection with the conference, several satellite workshops are being offered. There is no registration fee for the workshops. Descriptions and registration information can be found at http://www.causeweb.org/workshop/.

    Registration for USCOTS is $160 before April 1, 2009, and $220 thereafter. Faculty, staff and students of CAUSE institutional members receive a $20 discount. Registration includes conference lunches and a banquet dinner. Resource materials on teaching statistics will also be provided to all participants. Some registration grants are available.

    To register for USCOTS 09, visit the website at http://www.causeweb.org/uscots.

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    News from the Journal of Statistics Education

    Bill Notz, Editor

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    New editor search underway

    This is my final year as editor of JSE. The search for a new editor has begun. The new editor will serve from 2010 through 2012, with the transition beginning in 2009.

    Preview of coming attractions

    We are busy putting together the March 2009 issue. We expect to announce that it is ready in late March. The issue will contain 11 papers along with the Teaching Bits section. The 11 papers are the following:

    You will have to wait until March for the contents, however.

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    Teaching Statistics

    Roger Johnson, Editor

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    The current issue (the first issue of 2009) is freely available at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/teachingstatistics.

    Online supplementary materials may accompany articles published in the journal. So, for example, if you wish to submit an article which includes the analysis of data not easily listed within your article, then this data may be placed online for access by readers. Microsoft Office files and various graphics, video, and audio files -- up to a reasonable size -- may all be placed online. For more complete details, visit http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/bauthor/suppmat.asp.

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    Technology Innovations in Statistics Education

    Rob Gould, UCLA

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    The e-journal Technology Innovations in Statistics Education (TISE) recently published Volume 2, which included papers by Cliff Konold and Sibel Kazak (Reconnecting Data and Chance), Ann Ooms and Joan Garfield (A Model to Evaluate Online Educational Resources in Statistics), and Michelle Everson and Joan Garfield (An Innovative Approach to Teaching Online Statistics Courses).

    In order to better serve authors and readers, beginning with Volume 3 in March, TISE will publish papers as they are accepted. An announcement will be sent to subscribers each quarter to alert our readers to new publications.

    Volume 3, Issue 1 will include papers by Jane Watson and Julie Donne (TinkerPlots as a Research Tool to Explore Student Understanding) and Webster West (Social Data Analysis with StatCrunch: Potential Benefits to Statistical Education). Both papers will be available at the end of March.

    TISE welcomes research reports of empirical studies, papers that develop a theoretical context for teaching with technology or teaching technology itself, position papers on timely issues, and descriptions of new, innovative technologies. We seek papers on the themes of designing technology to improve statistics education, using technology to develop conceptual understanding, and teaching the use of technology to gain insight into and access to data.

    To read papers, make submissions, subscribe (free) or contact the editors, please visit http://tise.stat.ucla.edu.

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    Statistics Education Research Journal

    Peter Petocz, Editor

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    The latest edition of SERJ (Statistics Education Research Journal) was published online last November and is available at http://www.stat.auckland.ac.nz/~iase/publications.php?show=serj. The issue is a 'special issue' on the topic of Informal Inferential Reasoning (IIR) -- intuitive and informal ways of reasoning about statistical inference -- guest edited by Dave Pratt and Janet Ainsley of the University of London and the University of Leicester, respectively. It contains articles by a range of statistics educators at the forefront of this field, considering the epistemological, psychological and pedagogic dimensions that underpin informal inferential reasoning at any level of education. Researchers who have some familiarity with IIR will want to look through these papers (if they haven't done so already), while those who don't yet have any background in this area will find the special issue a useful way to find out the current state of thinking.

    In the next issue look for the following articles:

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    Announcement and Solicitation of Nominations for the Waller Education Award for Contributions to the Teaching of Elementary Statistics

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    The Section on Statistical Education administered the Waller Award for seven years. After thorough discussion, a proposal to make the award an ASA award was submitted to the Committee on Meetings in June of last year. The committee reported favorably on the proposal during its meeting at the end of October, and the ASA Board approved the change at its December meeting. I want to thank Ron Wasserstein for guiding us through this process. Now, it is time to nominate people for this prestigious award!

    Former ASA Executive Director Ray Waller and his wife Carolyn initiated the Waller Education Award through a generous donation. The award provides recognition to an individual who has been teaching full-time for ten or fewer years, and who has demonstrated innovation in the instruction of elementary statistics. The recipient should have responsibility for teaching "the first course" in statistics in a two-year college, a four-year college, or a research university. Graduate teaching assistants may be nominated for the award.

    The recipient is selected according to the following criteria:

    Nominations should be submitted as a complete packet, consisting of:

    Nominations must be received by April 10, 2009. Electronic submissions are encouraged and should be sent to June Morita at june@stat.washington.edu. Nominations may also be mailed to: Waller Education Award Committee, c/o June Morita, Department of Statistics, B-313 Padelfor Hall, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195-4322. Questions may be addressed to june@stat.washington.edu. The recipient will be honored at the 2009 Joint Statistical Meetings in Washington, D.C.

    For a deserving individual to be recognized, someone must make the effort to put forward a nomination packet for him or her. Please look around you and make that effort today!!

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    NSF's Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program, Track 1: A Good Place to Start for Submitting Statistics Education Grant Proposals

    Newsletter for the Section on Statistical Education
    Volume 14, Number 1 (Spring 2009)


    Are you looking for a good place to start submitting grant proposals in statistics education to the National Science Foundation? Are you interested in trying out a new and innovative teaching approach in the statistics courses at your institution? Do you have a great idea for developing new curriculum materials and testing them out to see if they work? If so, then the National Science Foundation's Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program, Track 1 might be a good place to start.

    However, don't stop reading just because you are already experienced with CCLI. There have been changes made to the program, especially for projects with a large scope and scale. The new program solicitation for CCLI (NSF 09-529) is published on the NSF website at http://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=nsf09529.

    Big Picture:
    CCLI seeks to improve the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education for all undergraduate students. To achieve this goal, CCLI supports the following activities: creating learning materials and strategies, implementing new instructional strategies, developing faculty expertise, assessing and evaluating student achievement, and conducting research on undergraduate stem education. Depending on the scope, scale, and stage of the proposed work, you would consider applying for Type 1, 2 or 3 projects or CCLI Central Resource Projects. Below you will find a very brief summary of each type of project along with budget limitations and proposal deadlines. The program solicitation provides a list of examples for each type of proposal which help demonstrate the scope and scale. Type 2 and 3 projects will typically reflect greater dependence on previous work, supported by the CCLI program or by other sources, and may be at a more mature stage of development than Type 1 projects.

    Type 1 Projects: Even though Type 1 projects are a "starting place for new innovations," the results from these projects are expected to be significant enough to contribute to understanding undergraduate STEM education. Proposed evaluation efforts, which may include pilot studies, should be informative with respect to student learning or engagement.
    Budget Limit: $200,000 ($250,000 when four-year colleges and universities collaborate with two-year colleges) for 2 to 3 years
    Proposal Deadline: May 21 or 22, 2009 (depending on the first letter of your state name)

    Type 2 Projects: Type 2 projects will typically address more than one program component, or, if they focus on a single component, will address it at a scale that goes well beyond a single institution. Type 2 projects should carry the development to a state in which the evaluations of the projects have evidence to support the claim that the projectsí efforts are effective. At a minimum, the implementation, if successful, should be institutionalized at the participating colleges and universities.
    Budget Limit: $600,000 for 2 to 4 years
    Proposal Deadline: January 13, 2010

    Type 3 Projects: Type 3 projects are intended to support large scale efforts. These projects can either continue previous work or break new ground at a large scale. Evaluation activities should be focused on the impact of student learning in a broad spectrum of the population served by the project. Evaluation plans for Type 3 projects should include efforts to describe the impact of the work on the prevailing models of undergraduate STEM education and to include strategies that assist in the implementation of the project's activities in new contexts.
    Budget Limit: Negotiable, but not to exceed $5,000,000 over 5 years
    Proposal Deadline: January 13, 2010

    CCLI Central Resource Projects: CCLI Central Resource projects assume responsibility for leadership and implementation of activities that sustain a community of practice engaged in transforming undergraduate STEM education. These projects will work to increase the capabilities of and communications among the STEM education community and to increase and document the impact of CCLI projects. CCLI Central Resource projects that work across the disciplines, and at a national scale, are encouraged.
    Budget Limit: Negotiable depending on the scope and scale of the activity for up to 5 years
    Proposal Deadline: January 13, 2010
    Note: CCLI Central Resource Project proposals for small focused workshops may be submitted at any time after consulting with a program officer.

    As you are writing your proposal, please remember that all projects must include intellectual merit and broader impacts as separate statements in the project summary or the proposal will be returned without review. Don't forget to elaborate on those review criteria in the project description as well. Furthermore, the program solicitation describes the following important features that ALL promising projects share: quality, relevance, and impact; student focus; use of and contribution to knowledge about STEM education; STEM education community-building; sustainability; expected measurable outcomes; and project evaluation. Read the program solicitation carefully. Additionally, a revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG), NSF 09-1, is effective for proposals submitted on or after January 5, 2009.†

    Once a proposal is submitted, it will undergo a peer review process as well as review by NSF Program Officers. NSF's goal is to have 70% of proposals processed (either awarded or declined) within six months of the submission deadline. Hopefully, you will be able to turn your exciting, innovative, idea for improving STEM education into a winning proposal.

    If at anytime in the proposal writing process you have a question, then you can contact a program officer. For those of you who know program officer Elizabeth Teles, she has recently retired after 17 years of service to NSF. You may also know program officer Lee Zia, who is on a one-year leave of absence to take advantage of a fellowship opportunity. Currently, there are two program officers in the Division of Undergraduate Education's mathematical sciences group who will be working on CCLI: Dan Maki (dmaki@nsf.gov, 703-292-4620) and Ginger Holmes Rowell (growell@nsf.gov, 703-292-5108). We would be very glad to talk with you about your CCLI proposal ideas.

    (This information was submitted by Ginger Holmes Rowell. Ginger is on a leave of absence from Middle Tennessee State University, where she is a Professor of Mathematics, to work at the National Science Foundation in the Division of Undergraduate Education. The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the view and opinions of the National Science Foundation.)

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