Web-Based Lectures





Title: Graduate Training Fellowships and Grants: Opportunities and Advice
Presenter: Lance Waller, Emory University
Date and Time: TBD
Sponsor: ASA Committee on Funded Research
Twitter Hashtag: #ASAwebinar

Registration Deadline:TBD

Description:
This webinar will provide a brief review of individual graduate fellowships and training grants (F and T series) from the National Institutes of Health, as well as the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) Summer Institute in Biostatistics (SIBS) program. General overviews of the funding mechanisms, application and review process (including the necessary documentation for trainers and trainees), and administration of funded training programs will be presented. Advice and comments from the perspectives of a faculty director, faculty mentor, and colleague of training directors at other institutions will be provided. Topics include training content for didactic coursework, hands-on laboratory exercises, individual and group work, logistical details, program follow-up and evaluation, and initiatives for supporting a diverse participant base.

Bio:
Lance A. Waller is a professor in the department of biostatistics and bioinformatics at Emory University Rollins School of Public Health. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics and has served on National Academies committees on applied and theoretical statistics, cancer near nuclear facilities, geographic assessments of exposure to Agent Orange, and standoff explosive technologies. His research involves the development of statistical methods for geographic data, including applications in environmental justice, epidemiology, disease surveillance, spatial cluster detection, conservation biology, and disease ecology. His research appears in biostatistical, statistical, environmental health, and ecology journals and in the textbook Applied Spatial Statistics for Public Health Data (2004, Wiley). Waller has also led two T32 training grants, one from National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the other from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and served as director of the NHLBI SIBS site at Emory for the past nine years.

Registration:
This webinar is free to anyone who would like to attend. However, registration is limited so you must register to receive the access information.

Each registration is allowed one web connection. Sound is received via audio streaming from your computer’s speakers. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Check back soon for registration link.




Title: Exploring the Census Bureau’s Response Outreach Area Mapper (ROAM): A Tool for Planning Surveys and Censuses
Presenters: Nancy Bates and Suzanne McArdle, U.S. Census Bureau
Date and Time: Wednesday, September 18, 2019, 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Survey Research Methods Section, Government Statistics Section, and the Washington Statistical Society

Registration Deadline: Tuesday, September 17, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
The presenters will demonstrate how to use the Response Outreach Area Mapper (ROAM). ROAM makes it easier to identify hard-to-count areas and provides a socioeconomic and demographic characteristic profile of these areas using American Community Survey (ACS) estimates available in the Planning Database (PDB). Learning about each hard-to-count area allows the U.S. Census Bureau to create a tailored communication and partnership campaign, and to plan for field resources including hiring staff with language skills. It is also helping external stakeholders do the same. Complete Count Committees, tribal, state, and local governments, as well as community groups, are conducting outreach, education, and engagement across the country. These and other efforts can improve response rates. ROAM’s thematic map shows the Low Response Score—a projected propensity to self-respond to the 2020 Census—by census tract to help identify hard-to-count areas. Among other variables, ROAM includes census tract-level characteristics such as poverty status, educational attainment, median household income, housing unit vacancy rates, race, Hispanic origin, and languages spoken at home. The latest ROAM release also includes several variables related to internet access such as broadband subscription and the availability of computers and smartphones in households. Finally, the 2020 Census Audience Segmentation data exists as a new thematic map layer. The eight category Audience Segmentation provides an overarching framework for understanding areas of the country by bringing together behavioral, demographic, attitudinal, and media usage data to help plan and develop messaging, advertising, partnership activities, and other communications. ROAM provides direct access to the strategic summary profiles developed for each audience segment.

ROAM has many potential uses including:

  • Identifying geographic areas for special outreach and promotional efforts.
  • Examining expected self-completion rates in local areas.
  • Identifying geographic areas that meet a particular set of characteristics using Data Table tools.
  • Adding other open source spatial data layers into the map.
Websites:

Planning Database (PDB)
https://www.census.gov/topics/research/guidance/planning-databases.html

Response Outreach Area Mapper (ROAM)
https://www.census.gov/roam

Registration:
This webinar is FREE to anyone who would like to attend. However, registration is limited so you must register to receive the access information. The access information will be emailed to everyone who has registered the afternoon of Tuesday, September 17. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

 

Register




Title: An Introduction to Causal Inference, and Extensions to Interference
Presenter: Michael Hudgens, University of North Carolina
Date and Time: Monday, September 23, 2019, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Mental Health Statistics Section

Registration Deadline: Friday, September 20, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
Often in mental health research it is of interest to assess the effect of a treatment (or exposure or policy) on a mental health related outcome. In this webinar we will consider the potential outcome (counterfactual) framework to drawing inference about the casual effect of a treatment. This webinar will have two parts. The first part will provide a basic introduction to causal inference, briefly covering topics such as confounding, propensity scores, and inverse probability weighting. The second part of the webinar will describe recent extensions of causal inference methods that allow for interference, i.e., the possibility that treatment of one individual affects the outcome of another individual. Such interference or peer effects can occur in settings where individuals interact, such as households, classrooms, neighborhoods, or social media.

Registration:
Member of the Mental Health Statistics Section: $60
ASA Member: $90
Nonmember: $110

Each registration is allowed one connection to the webinar. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Friday, September 20, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




Title: Assessing When Electronic Health Records or Claims Databases Are Fit for a Specific Research Question or Regulatory Purpose
Presenter: Cynthia J Girman, DrPH, FISPE, CERobs Consulting, LLC
Date and Time: Friday, September 27, 2019, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Biopharmaceutical Section

Registration Deadline: Wednesday, September 25, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Background:
There is escalating interest in the use of real-world data (RWD), particularly insurance claims and electronic medical records, not only for safety but also for effectiveness evaluation. The Food & Drug Administration released a framework for public comment in December 2018, which focused on randomized trials in clinical practice, potential observational designs, and data quality aspects for the use of real-world evidence (RWE) in regulatory and clinical contexts.

Objective:
To review the FDA framework on RWD and provide a structured study-specific context by which to assess the feasibility of using RWD for a specific research question or regulatory purpose (new indication or expanded labeling).

Description:
There is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to qualifying a data source for broad research or regulatory purposes because the feasibility of using RWD depends on the decision for which the results will be used, the anticipated effect size and the quality of the data critically needed to address the specific research question. Accuracy and reliability of data (including extent of missing data) to define specific elements of the research question, such as the population, intervention, comparator and outcome, fundamentally drive whether RWD in electronic health record or claims databases can be useful for a specific decision. Ascertainment and adequate capture of these elements along with the sample size and anticipated treatment effect size leads to a practical approach for assessing the feasibility of RWD in the context of the specific research question. Discussion will consider perspectives on the use of RWD for internal pharmaceutical company decision-making as well as the use of RWD for regulatory labeling or new indications.

Registration:
Biopharmaceutical Section Members: $0
ASA Members: $59
Nonmembers: $74

Each registration is allowed one web connection. Sound is received via audio streaming from your computer’s speakers. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Wednesday, September 25, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




Title: Multilevel Regression and Poststratification
Presenter: Yajuan Si, University of Michigan
Date and Time: Thursday, October 10, 2019, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Survey Research Methods Section

Registration Deadline: Tuesday, October 8, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
Multilevel regression and poststratification (MRP), a method originally applied to political polls, has become increasingly popular with applications to demography, epidemiology, and many other areas. Adapted from hierarchical models, MRP is an approach to modeling survey or other nonrepresentative sample data that has the potential to adjust for complex design features and nonresponse bias while performing small area estimation. The seminar covers the statistical concepts and practical issues in implementing MRP with real-life application examples. We will introduce the assumptions and properties of MRP, connecting with calibration methods. Recent developments of MRP for survey weighting and inference of probability/non-probability samples will be covered. We will conclude with some cautions and challenging issues in the application of MRP.

Registration:
SRMS Members: $60
ASA Members: $75
Nonmembers: $95

Each registration is allowed one connection to the webinar. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Tuesday, October 8, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




Title: Some Frequently Asked Questions about the Design and Analysis of Sequential, Multiple Assignment Randomized Trials
Presenter: Daniel Almirall, University of Michigan
Date and Time: Wednesday, November 20, 2019, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Mental Health Statistics Section

Registration Deadline: Monday, November 18, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
Dynamic treatment regimens (also known as adaptive interventions) use a sequence of decision rules that guide whether, how, or when—and, importantly, based on which measures—to make critical decisions about intervention (e.g., treatment) in clinical, education or policy settings. This includes whether, how or when to alter the dosage (duration, frequency, or amount), type, or delivery of interventions to patients, students (or organizations). These interventions seek to address the individual and changing needs of students (or organizations) as they progress through an intervention. A SMART is a type of multi-stage, experimental design that was developed explicitly for constructing effective DTRs. While research on DTRs and SMART methods has grown exponentially in the past few years, substantive scientists and applied statistical workers still have many questions about the design of a SMART. This could lead to misconceptions or to limiting the novelty or significance (impact) of the proposed study design.

This non-technical webinar begins to fill this gap. Specifically, this webinar highlights some important principles of design and data analysis for SMARTs using a “Frequently Asked Questions” approach. Specifically, we pose a number of FAQs (which may come either from the perspective of a substantive scientist or applied statistical worker) and we work through possible responses to them. The FAQs presented in this webinar are the most common among a longer compilation of FAQs which have been collected based on over 10 years of experience designing these trial designs. We cover topics such as the distinction between a DTR and a SMART, control groups, the role of randomization, sample sizes, and embedded tailoring variables. We illustrate these ideas using a number of studies aiming to develop high-quality DTRs in mental health.

This webinar promises to be of interest to a broad array of statistical scientists and their collaborators, including medical or behavioral intervention scientists, methodologists and biostatisticians.

Registration:
Member of the Mental Health Statistics or Biometrics Section: $60
ASA Member: $90
Nonmember: $110

Each registration is allowed one connection to the webinar. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Monday, November 18, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.