Web-Based Lectures





Title: Graduate Training Fellowships and Grants: Opportunities and Advice
Presenter: Lance Waller, Emory University
Date and Time: TBD
Sponsor: ASA Committee on Funded Research
Twitter Hashtag: #ASAwebinar

Registration Deadline:TBD

Description:
This webinar will provide a brief review of individual graduate fellowships and training grants (F and T series) from the National Institutes of Health, as well as the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) Summer Institute in Biostatistics (SIBS) program. General overviews of the funding mechanisms, application and review process (including the necessary documentation for trainers and trainees), and administration of funded training programs will be presented. Advice and comments from the perspectives of a faculty director, faculty mentor, and colleague of training directors at other institutions will be provided. Topics include training content for didactic coursework, hands-on laboratory exercises, individual and group work, logistical details, program follow-up and evaluation, and initiatives for supporting a diverse participant base.

Bio:
Lance A. Waller is a professor in the department of biostatistics and bioinformatics at Emory University Rollins School of Public Health. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Mathematical Sciences and Analytics and has served on National Academies committees on applied and theoretical statistics, cancer near nuclear facilities, geographic assessments of exposure to Agent Orange, and standoff explosive technologies. His research involves the development of statistical methods for geographic data, including applications in environmental justice, epidemiology, disease surveillance, spatial cluster detection, conservation biology, and disease ecology. His research appears in biostatistical, statistical, environmental health, and ecology journals and in the textbook Applied Spatial Statistics for Public Health Data (2004, Wiley). Waller has also led two T32 training grants, one from National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the other from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and served as director of the NHLBI SIBS site at Emory for the past nine years.

Registration:
This webinar is free to anyone who would like to attend. However, registration is limited so you must register to receive the access information.

Each registration is allowed one web connection. Sound is received via audio streaming from your computer’s speakers. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Check back soon for registration link.



Title: RAPID Recovery from Breakdowns is Possible
Presenter: Doug Zahn
Date and Time: Thursday, November 7, 2019, 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Section on Statistical Consulting

Registration Deadline: Tuesday, November 5, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
This webinar is relevant to everyone in the Section on Statistical Consulting as well as those ASA members interested in the practice of consulting. Since we all have breakdowns at one time or another, recovering from them is essential to master. By “breakdown” I mean any failure to function as intended. In communication, breakdowns occur when the client does not hear what the statistical consultant intended to say and vice versa.

The primary message of this webinar is that we can recover from these breakdowns. It is a learned skill. Rapid recovery is important because when we experience a breakdown we tend to fall into an "emotional cloud." The first step in recovery is to recognize that you are in an emotional cloud, followed quickly by step two which is to address the cloud and take the necessary steps to get out of it. Successfully executing this process will get you back into useful communication with your client.

The idea of rapid recovery from breakdowns to improve relationships has been of interest to me since I first saw a video of a consultation in which I was engulfed in an emotional cloud for almost the entire consultation. I thought at the time that this was the client's fault and thus did not look for anything I could learn from the incident. Conversations with colleagues led me to see how I had contributed to various breakdowns and that I could have responded differently to improve this conversation and thus the relationship. I had much to learn from this interaction and continue to do so. I will share these lessons with you in the webinar and explore similar experiences in your career.

Bio:
Doug Zahn earned a PhD in statistics from Harvard University. He is a professor emeritus of the Florida State University Department of Statistics, where he taught applied statistics and statistical consulting courses for thirty-five years. He provided consulting services to faculty and students. For over nine years he coached consulting professionals at the United Kingdom Office for National Statistics while coteaching a course on consultancy skills. Zahn is the coauthor of The Human Side of Statistical Consulting and Quality Management Plus: The Continuous Improvement of Education. He and his wife, Andrea, live in Tallahassee, Florida.

Registration:
Member of the Section on Statistical Consulting: $20
ASA Member: $65
Nonmember: $85

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Registration is closed.

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Tuesday, November 5, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




Title: Some Frequently Asked Questions about the Design and Analysis of Sequential, Multiple Assignment Randomized Trials
Presenter: Daniel Almirall, University of Michigan
Date and Time: Wednesday, November 20, 2019, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Mental Health Statistics Section

Registration Deadline: Monday, November 18, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
Dynamic treatment regimens (also known as adaptive interventions) use a sequence of decision rules that guide whether, how, or when—and, importantly, based on which measures—to make critical decisions about intervention (e.g., treatment) in clinical, education or policy settings. This includes whether, how or when to alter the dosage (duration, frequency, or amount), type, or delivery of interventions to patients, students (or organizations). These interventions seek to address the individual and changing needs of students (or organizations) as they progress through an intervention. A SMART is a type of multi-stage, experimental design that was developed explicitly for constructing effective DTRs. While research on DTRs and SMART methods has grown exponentially in the past few years, substantive scientists and applied statistical workers still have many questions about the design of a SMART. This could lead to misconceptions or to limiting the novelty or significance (impact) of the proposed study design.

This non-technical webinar begins to fill this gap. Specifically, this webinar highlights some important principles of design and data analysis for SMARTs using a “Frequently Asked Questions” approach. Specifically, we pose a number of FAQs (which may come either from the perspective of a substantive scientist or applied statistical worker) and we work through possible responses to them. The FAQs presented in this webinar are the most common among a longer compilation of FAQs which have been collected based on over 10 years of experience designing these trial designs. We cover topics such as the distinction between a DTR and a SMART, control groups, the role of randomization, sample sizes, and embedded tailoring variables. We illustrate these ideas using a number of studies aiming to develop high-quality DTRs in mental health.

This webinar promises to be of interest to a broad array of statistical scientists and their collaborators, including medical or behavioral intervention scientists, methodologists and biostatisticians.

Registration:
Member of the Mental Health Statistics or Biometrics Section: $60
ASA Member: $90
Nonmember: $110

Each registration is allowed one connection to the webinar. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Monday, November 18, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




Title: Review of Precision Medicine in Chronic Illness
Presenter: Eric Laber
Date and Time: Monday, December 2, 2019, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Mental Health Statistics Section

Registration Deadline: Tuesday, November 26, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
The vision for precision medicine is to tailor interventions to the evolving health status of each patient to optimize long term health outcomes. In this webinar we examine the state-of-the-art of precision medicine with a focus on applications in mental health. An outline of the webinar is as follows: we will formalize an optimal treatment regime using the language of potential outcomes, discuss assumptions needed to identify these regimes from randomized or observational data, review existing methods for estimation, introduce SMART and MRT designs for precision medicine, and then close with a discussion of active research areas and open problems.

Registration:
Member of the Mental Health Statistics Section: $60
ASA Member: $90
Nonmember: $110

Each registration is allowed one connection to the webinar. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Tuesday, November 26, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.




Title: Statistical Consulting and Collaboration at the US Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station
Presenter: Nels Johnson
Date and Time: Tuesday, December 3, 2019, 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Eastern time
Sponsor: Section on Statistical Consulting

Registration Deadline: Monday, December 2, at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time

Description:
The US Forest Service is a federal land management agency in the United States Department of Agriculture tasked with managing US National Forests, US National Grasslands, and US National Recreation Areas. The US Forest Service has a research and development arm to assist with this mission. The Pacific Southwest Research Station is the portion of the R&D arm focused on research affecting California, Hawaii, and the US affiliated Pacific Islands. Scientists and statisticians at the Pacific Southwest Research Station are frequently not collocated or in the same time zone. In this webinar we will discuss strategies for communicating and managing meetings and projects over such large geographic distances. Additionally, we will discuss strategies to reduce isolation among statisticians and increase collaboration between them.

Bio:
Dr. Nels G. Johnson is a Mathematical Statistician with the US Forest Service where he serves in the role of Station Statistician for the Pacific Southwest Research Station from their office in Albany, California. There, he provides in-house statistical consultation and collaboration services, as well as statistical review of study plans and manuscripts for Forest Service Research Scientists and their staff. His primary areas of application are ecology, forestry, wildlife biology, and natural resource management. In his free time he enjoys yoga, swimming, classical music, movies, and computer/board/video games.

Registration:
Member of the Section on Statistical Consulting: $20
ASA Member: $65
Nonmember: $85

Each registration is allowed one web connection and one audio connection. Multiple persons are encouraged to view each registered connection (for example, by projecting the webinar in a conference room).

Register

Access Information
Registered persons will be sent an email the afternoon of Monday, December 2, with the access information to join the webinar and the link to download and print a copy of the presentation slides.